LEE Filters 100x100 Little Stopper 6-Stop ND

Rp 1.800.000
Shipping Weight: 0.14 kg per item
FND18141
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The Little Stopper


The Little Stopper is a neutral density filter that reduces the light entering your lens by six stops.

The Little Stopper is ideal for those low-light conditions at the beginning and end of the day (when the Big Stopper’s ten stops may prove too much), allowing you to enjoy increased flexibility with exposure lengths.

In many shooting conditions the Little Stopper will retain detail and texture in areas of movement such as the sky and water, while still conveying a sense of time passing.




Why use a Little Stopper?

At six stops, the Little Stopper is ideal for those low-light conditions at the beginning and end of the day (when the Big Stopper's ten stops may prove too much), allowing you to enjoy increased flexibility with exposure lengths.

In many shooting conditions, this means that detail and texture in areas of movement such as the sky and water would be reatined, while still conveying a sense of time passing.


How to use a Stopper with Jonathan Chritchley


The Stopper Range of long exposure filters from LEE Filters - Little Stopper, Big Stopper and Super Stopper.

In this video fine art photographer Jonathan Chritchley demonstrates how to get the most from your Stopper filters.

Features practical tips and creative inspiration for anyone exploring long exposure photography. He demonstrates the Big & Little Stopper but the techniques and advice are also applicable to the Super Stopper.


Professional hints:White balance

Use of Stopper filters may result in a slight colour cast. This is easily corrected in post-production, usually with a simple click of the auto white balance button..

Alternatively using auto white balance in the camera may help, but it is always best to do some tests.


Shooting tips

When making long exposures always use the sturdiest tripod you can, and take care not to knock the camera or tripod. If possible use a cable release or remote shutter release.

Cover your viewfinder before releasing the shutter to avoid light encroaching onto the sensor or film and causing flare.



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